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Why buy a real Christmas Tree?

Christmas Tree banner

Christmas tree growing is an all year-round operation, involving specialist attention from the initial site preparation to the ongoing maintenance of the crop. On average it takes 7 – 10 years for a Christmas tree to grow to a minimum height of 2 metres. Above we show the cycle of production from growing on the farm, to harvesting, delivery and final sale to consumer.

'Love a Real Tree' Campaign

The Irish Christmas Tree Growers Association's initiative, 'Love a Real Tree', aims to highlight the benefits of choosing a real Christmas tree for your home.

The website www.lovearealtree.ie has lots of information and highlights the benefits of a real tree versus an artificial tree. Facts include that real Irish Christmas trees are environmentally friendly as they can be recycled, while the land used for growing them can be replanted or returned to traditional agriculture.

Speaking about the campaign, grower Christy Kavanagh said, “The look, the scent and the very feel of a real tree are all part of the Christmas tradition! Growing the perfect tree takes more than planting a tree and hoping for the best. It takes seven to ten years to produce a 2 metre tall tree, and this means year round care for the life of the tree by growers to produce the best tree possible. When you buy a real Christmas tree, carefully grown and cultured locally, there is that extra special knowledge that you are supporting nature and the environment.”

Why Buy a Real Irish Christmas tree?

  1. Irish Christmas trees are really fresh due to the reduced travel stress on them.
  2. Once cared for properly, non-shedding trees such as the Noble Fir and Lodge pole Pine will retain their needles for weeks in your home.
  3. Real Christmas trees remain good value and can be recycled after use at locations nationwide, creating compost for gardens and landscape use.
  4. Each tree is cultured as an individual tree and produced to the highest quality standards from the time they are planted right through to delivery.
  5.  In accordance with sustainable yield management promoted by the Forest Service new Christmas trees are continually being planted to replace those trees harvested.
  6. During the ten year growing period one hectare of Christmas trees produces between 70 and 105 tons of oxygen

Caring for your Tree

  • After purchasing your tree, cut an inch or two off the bottom of the tree’s stem and stand it in a bucket of water.  Shake off any loose needles before bringing the tree indoors.
  • Once inside, stand the tree in a special Christmas tree stand or in a bucket with a water bowl.  Add a pint of water to the water bowl and top up daily.

Christmas Tree Safety

  • Place the tree in the coolest part of the room making sure it is properly secured and away from doorways, stairs, heaters, radiators and open fires.
  • Make sure that lights on the Christmas tree or lights used for decoration elsewhere are properly wired and comply with the current EU standards of safety.
  • Always unplug tree lights and other decorations when leaving the house or going to bed.

After Christmas

After the festive season, your tree can also be recycled for use as mulch - check your local Council or Corporation website for Christmas tree recycling arrangements. If potted, your tree can also be replanted in your garden.

Where to buy

Find out where the nearest Christmas tree outlet is in your area.  This can include shopping centres, garden centres and any of the members of the Irish Christmas Tree Grower Association. You and your family can have a lovely Christmas experience by travelling to a Christmas tree farm where you can select your own tree and have it cut down.  Alternatively, you can choose one already on display.

Facts & Figures

Value of the market (retail): circa. 21 Million
Demand in Ireland for trees: circa. 350,000
Trees grown per year: circa. 550,000
Number of growers: circa. 100
Tree types (% of EU market): Nordmann fir (70%); Noble fir (20%); Fraser fir (5%); Douglas fir, Scots pine, Norway spruce and Lodgepole pine (5%).