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  • Author: Cian Hassett, UK Market, Bord Bia - The Irish Food Board

     

    The UK Government on Monday released their new UK Border Operations Model. This announcement came following Sunday’s announcement of a £705 million investment in new infrastructure, jobs and technology at border points.The model is over 200 pages and outlines details of the government approach to customs declarations, safety and security declarations, VAT collection processes, and SPS & fishery controls post the end of the UK transition period on December 31st 2020.

     

    The principles of the Core Model will apply to all goods movements between GB and the EU, regardless of the mode of transport of the movement. The model includes details of the certification, pre-notification, Sanitary and Phytosanitary Standards (SPS)/Border Control Point (BCP) controls and when these controls will apply to imports of live animals, agri-food and fisheries products from the EU in to the UK. It sets out the requirements and process to apply based on the UK’s proposed 3 phase approach to introduction of controls

    • Phase 1 - January 2021
    • Phase 2 – April 2021         
    • Phase 3 – July 2021

    The document outlines the requirements for imports from the EU of agri-food and fisheries products, a summary of which can be found below:

    • Live Animals
      • From January 1st 2021: Pre-notification on UK IPAFFS system, export health certification, UK documentary checks and physical inspection at point of destination based on risk assessment by UK Government.
      • Depending on the type of animals, specific welfare requirements may apply, including the need for specifically approve transport vehicles, certificates of competence for drivers/handlers and, depending on the length of journey, a log would need to be submitted to APHA.
      • From July 1st 2021: BCP entry and controls at point of entry

     

    What we know about Products of Animal Origin (excl. Fishery products)

    • Traders importing standard goods will have up to six months after import date between January 1st and June 30th 2021 to submit customs declarations to HMRC.

     

    • If tariffs applicable, they will need to be paid on imports from January 1st, payments can also be deferred for up to six months after import date between January 1st and June 30th 2021 along with the deferred customs declaration.

     

    • Safety and Security declarations will not be required for six months for all goods. Traders will, however, need to consider some other processes, such as how they will account for import VAT.

     

    • Products of Animal Origin (excl. high risk ABPs and Germinal Products)
      • From January 1st: No change to current requirements
      • From April 1st: Pre-notification of import on IPAFFS, export health certification and UK government remote documentary checks
      • From July 1st: BCP entry and controls at point of entry

     

     

    • Fish Products
      • From January 1st: Catch certificate
      • From April 1st: Pre-notification of import on IPAFFS, export health certification and UK government remote documentary checks
      • From July 1st: BCP entry and controls at point of entry
      • EU Landings in UK ports: Must be at a designated UK port, providing 4 hours’ notice, submission of prior notification document and a catch certificate for fish that is being landed.

     

    • Plant Products
      • From January 1st: High risk plants and plant products to be accompanied by phytosanitary certificate, import pre-notification to be submitted by GB importer, documentary and identity checks required and physical inspections.
      • Information on locations for physical checks will be provided on UK government website in the future.
      • From April 1st: All regulated plant and plant products to be ac accompanied by phytosanitary certificate, import pre-notification to be submitted by GB importer, documentary and identity checks required and physical inspections.
      • From July 1st: Increased frequency of identity and physical checks.

     

    Following the announcement of Border Operating Model, HMRC issued a shorter summary guide on How to Import Goods from the EU to GB from January 2020.

     

    As had been previously established, these procedures will not apply to trade with Northern Ireland, for which separate arrangements are still being discussed. The second meeting of the Specialised Committee on the Protocol took place this week. The committee, overseeing the protection of the Good Friday Agreement, saw the intensification of technical discussions about how the border between Northern Ireland and Great Britain will work. The U.K. also told the EU about its plans to give guidance to businesses trading on that border in the coming weeks. The U.K. government said both sides discussed the preparatory work for future decisions to be taken by the Joint Committee. The UK must implement the provisions of the Protocol. They have published their Command Paper “The UK’s Approach to the Northern Ireland Protocol” which outlines how they intend to do so.